“Choosing wisely bacteriology II: Swabs from the peri-anal area”

There is so much scope for “choosing wisely” in general bacteriology, it is difficult to know where to start…

Peri-anal swabs are rarely of value in changing patient management. That is primarily because you are swabbing an incredibly “dirty” area in the first place. You can be sure that your peri-anal area will almost inevitably grow mixed enteric flora on culture. That is completely normal. It is no reflection on your personal hygiene!

So as a result the following swabs have very dubious microbiology value:

  • Swabs from peri-anal abscesses:- The very fact that you can swab a peri-anal abscess means that it is either self-discharging or has been intentionally incised. Either way the patient should be well on the way to recovery. And you will probably grow mixed enteric flora. On occasion, antibiotics may be indicated if there are systemic symptoms such as a fever, or there is extensive erythema surrounding the abscess. If an antibiotic is used, then it should be necessarily relatively broad spectrum, covering staphylococci, streptococci, anaerobes, and enterobacteraciae. The swab result rarely impacts on the choice of antibiotic.
  • Swabs from sacral ulcers:- This condition has the double whammy of not only being chronic, but is also in the peri-anal region. Rarely, if ever, does a superficial swab from a sacral ulcer change management. A well taken punch biopsy might…

We still accept such swabs at my laboratory, although sometimes I wonder if we are just encouraging poor practice.

Maybe we are just too nice…

We do however put a comment on all such swabs stating the following: “Superficial swabs from the peri-anal area are generally contraindicated. These swabs often grow a mixture of enteric flora, and are unhelpful in making clinical management decisions.”

I like report comments. Unlike one off educational material,  report comments offer continuous feedback to the lab user and can hopefully induce a change in culture over the long term.

Michael

One thought on ““Choosing wisely bacteriology II: Swabs from the peri-anal area”

  1. I too believe that feedback comments on reports benefit both sides and are a soft way of improving the relationship. But our lab is a bit of a renegade in this sense because issuing comments is not a desired practice according to our top management. We are supposed to be a factory for lab results.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *